All posts tagged “Recording”

Balance’s Clip Safe Recording

Posted by Mattias in Tutorials

In this micro tutorial we’re taking a look at the new Clip Safe feature when recording with our Balance audio interface and either Reason Essentials or Reason software. Clip Safe lets you restore distorted takes, saving what could have been a perfect performance if not for the overload.

As musicians, once we start recording and putting our “all” into the performance we often find that our playing is louder than it was when we set our levels. Those of us who have lost too many good takes to distortion end up recording while watching the levels carefully. That sort of distraction hurts the performance. It’s very difficult to be both performer and engineer at the same time.

Clip Safe lets us record, concentrate on our performance, and know that even if we do overload while recording we can simply repair our distorted audio and save the take.

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Peter Malick Home Sessions

Posted by Mattias on 2011-02-03 in Artist stories

Seasoned music producer and Norah Jones collaborator, Peter Malick, packed up his studio and moved it home to his living room and garage. For its maiden session he brought in indie artists Amber Rubarth, Courtney Jones, and a veritable A-List of players from the LA singer-songwriter scene. On Peter’s first days in the new space and first day on Record 1.5 we rolled cameras to capture the new ‘studio’ in action.

In the first video singer-songwriter Courtney Jones records her latest song, “Enemy Fire,” with Peter. The studio stretches through the entire house from the living room where the piano is set up, the den which has an unconventional drum kit, and the back room where Peter has run cables for a make-shift control room.

The second video follows day two in the new studio as Amber Rubarth invites her friends over to help her record “Full Moon in Paris.” Peter Malick balances the common limitations of home recording like a reduced number of microphones and a lack of isolation with the more important goal of capturing a special moment while not letting “bleed” decide important production decisions.

Please note that ‘Record’ is discontinued but all of its features, and then some, lives on in Reason!

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Recording Drums in your Home Studio

Posted by Mattias in Tutorials

By Giles Reaves

Drums are probably the oldest musical instrument in existence, as well as being one of the most popular. Drums are also one of the most basic instruments, having evolved little in concept through the years: at their most basic, drums are anything you strike which makes a sound!

As simple as they are, drums can be difficult to master. The same can be said of properly recording drums. While most folks may recommend that you go to a ‘real studio’ to record drums, that isn’t always a possibility. They will also tell you that drums are difficult to record properly, which is at least partly true. But it’s also true that there’s a lot you can do, even with a very limited setup – if you know some very basic techniques.

To introduce you to the world of drum recording at home, I’ve gathered some of my favorite tips and recording techniques in hopes of encouraging you to try your hand at recording some drums in your personal home studio. I’ll cover a few different scenarios from the single microphone approach on up to the many options that become available to you when you have multiple microphones.

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Preparing a Space for Recording (often on a budget)

Posted by Mattias in Tutorials

By Gary Bromham

When preparing a space for recording and mixing we enter a potential minefield, as no two areas will sound the same, and therefore no one-solution-fits-all instant fix is available. There are, however, a few systematic processes we can run through to facilitate vastly improving our listening environment.

When putting together a home studio, it is very easy to spend sometimes large sums of money buying equipment, and then to neglect the most important aspect of the sound; namely the environment set up and used for recording. No matter how much we spend on computers, speakers, guitars, keyboards or amps etc., we have to give priority to the space in which they are recorded.

Whether it be a house, apartment, or just a room, the method is still based on our ability to soundproof and apply sound treatment to the area. It is extremely difficult to predict what will happen to sound waves when they leave the speakers. Every room is different and it’s not just the dimensions that dictate how a room will sound. Assorted materials which make up walls, floors, ceilings, windows and doors – not to mention furniture – all have an effect on what we hear emanating from our monitors.


Fig 1. A vocal booth with off the shelf acoustic treatment fitted.

Whether we have a large or a small budget to sort out our space, there are a number of off-the-shelf or DIY solutions we can employ to help remedy our problem. It should be pointed out at this stage that a high-end studio and a home project studio are worlds apart. Professional studio design demands far higher specification and uses far narrower criteria as its benchmark, and therefore costs can easily run in to hundreds of thousands!

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Recording Vocals and Selecting a Microphone

Posted by Mattias in Tutorials

By Gary Bromham

Performing a lead vocal is arguably the toughest job in the recording studio. This in turn puts more emphasis on the importance of capturing and recording the vocal performance as perfectly as possible. Vocalists often tire easily and generally their early takes tend to be the best (before the thinking and over-analyzing takes over!)

Usually, and in a very short space of time, an engineer has to decide which mic, signal path (preamp, compressor eq etc) to use, set the correct level for recording and headphone balance, create the right atmosphere for singing and generally be subjected to, at best, minor grunts, at worst verbal abuse until the penny drops! Vocalists are a sensitive bunch and need nurturing, cuddling and whatever else it takes to make them feel like a supertar!

During this article I shall attempt to set out a strategy for accomplishing these goals and maybe throw in a tip or two I’ve picked up along the way to assist in capturing the perfect take.

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