Tutorials

How to Record Vocals in Reason 10

Posted May 22, 2018, 8 a.m.

Reason 10 is known for its robust collection of synthesizers, drum machines, and loops—but it also offers a powerful toolset for vocal production. With advanced features like time and pitch-correction, step sequencing, and a built-in sampler, Reason 10 offers a full-fledged vocal production suite. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to record vocals in Reason 10.

Vocals are arguably the most important part of any song, which is why Reason 10 was designed to make recording vocals quick and easy. Watch this video tutorial with Stefan Guy to learn how to:
 

  • Connect an audio interface and easily route mic signals
  • Properly set sample rate and buffer size for minimal latency
  • Create a well-balanced headphone mix
  • Accurately set microphone levels
  • Monitor levels on multiple channels using advanced metering
  • Use the precount function to improve your workflow
  • Create the perfect take using the comping feature
     

And that’s only the beginning—with Reason 10 you can adjust the time and pitch of your track after you record using advanced editing features like Pitch Edit and Time Stretch. You can even mix and master your vocal recordings in Reason 10 with acclaimed signal processors modeled after classic British consoles.

Now that you know how to record vocals in Reason 10, it’s time to start singing!

Start your free trial of Reason 10 today!

 

Tutorials

How to Make Trap/Hip Hop Beats in Reason 10

Posted May 15, 2018, 8:25 a.m.

Reason and hip hop have a long history together. In fact, DIY and indie hip hop producers were some of Reason’s earliest adopters, thanks to its intuitive interface, fast and creative workflow, and wealth of sound libraries built right into the platform. In this tutorial, we’ll explore the basics of hip hop beatmaking and show you how to make a hip hop beat in Reason 10.

From crisp modern trap beats to low-fi instrumentals, it pays to take a look at some of the sounds and techniques that have historically defined the genre. All genres are identifiable by their signature rhythms: EDM’s steady, pulsing kicks, the trademark swing of jazz, and funk’s heavy syncopation. With hip hop, the groove itself provides the foundation for everything—the kick and snare hold down a solid pocket, while the hi-hats, claps, and other percussion make the groove bounce and sway with swung subdivisions and expressive accents. There are multiple techniques you can use to create the groove, but we’ll start with sampling.

Ever since producers started lifting drum loops from records, samples have dominated the genre and can make a great foundation for a groove or chorus hook. Reason 10 is packed with powerful sampling tools—choose a sample from the included sound libraries or record your own, then chop, screw, and warp them with Dr. Octo Rex and the Grain Sample Manipulator. To learn more, check out our recent blog post “How To Chop Samples in Reason 10.”

Drum machines are another staple of hip hop production, especially the booming kick and snappy analog sounds of the Roland TR-808. Bass is an equally crucial element—whether it’s a funky synth, a sampled Motown groove, or even a pitch-shifted 808 kick, a good bassline is what really makes a track bump. Reason 10 is packed with powerful bass synths and easy-to-use drum machines modeled after some of the most legendary hardware units in history, giving you a wealth of creative options at your fingertips.

Although most of the raw power in hip hop comes from the rhythm section, a memorable melody can add the right hook to elevate any track. After all, who could forget the laid-back synth leads on “Gin and Juice?” Where would A Tribe Called Quest be without those tasty sax samples? And what better way to add some R&B flavor than with a silky electric piano? Even if you're not a pro on the keyboard, Reason makes it easy with the Scales & Chords Player.

Reason puts all the tools and sounds you need to make a great beat right at your fingertips. Check out this video above to learn!

Now that you've had a primer on how to make a hip hop beat in Reason 10, it’s time to  and let your creativity flow!

Start your free trial of Reason 10 today.

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Tutorials

Create Vaporwave with Layers Wave Edition

Posted April 17, 2018, 2:53 p.m.

Layers Wave Edition comes supercharged with the nostalgic, funk-induced sounds of Vaporwave - In this brief tutorial we will show you how to make the most of these kitsch and classic 80s inspired presets to create the much loved sound of Vaporwave in Reason. 

This is what we're making today:

 

 

Download
   Download the Reason song file and get started making Vaporwave with Layers Wave Edition!
 

Step 1. Create an harmonic bed

Central to the Vaporwave sound is a dense textural bed created from either the down-sampling effect of the original music, tape noise or aliasing of audio recordings. Layers Wave Edition has a trusty folder of Texture presets ideal for dense harmonic to build you instrumental on top of.

I’ve selected the patch ‘Inside A Rainbow’ which modulates gracefully over 9 bars adding so intriguing background noise.
 


Notice the heavy use of Flanger across all three four layers, heavy effects processing especially with era specific processing such as Chorus, Flanger and Phasers taken to the extreme are a hallmark of the vaporwave sound.
 


Step 2. Lockdown a funky bassline

Don’t be afraid to get extra funky on this one, as with a lot of 80s electronic music that Vaporwave samples, we want to incorporate a generous amount of vibrato.

For this sound I’ve chosen the Ultimate Peaks Bass patch which at its core uses a DX-7 style sound that couldn’t be more recognisable when it comes to Retro, Synth or Vaporwave inspired music.
 


Vaporwave is notorious for its abuse of distortion, tape-generated or otherwise, so I’ve gone full throttle on the fuzz distortion layer to really give it a crunchy character.


Step 3. Deep pads are a must

Synthetic bell sounds are a hallmark of the period and we’ve chosen the huge bell pad as the harmonic bass in the track. A repeating chord figure in C-minor is traditional Vaporwave territory – again don’t be afraid to go to town with the flanging and distortion here as it brings out the right character of the pads.
 


Step 4. Build a syncopated Rhythm.

The Sequencer & Arpeggio presets are ideal for driving syncopated rhythms, a definitive drive of Vaporwave rhythmic structure.
 


The trig sequencer pattern of DataMiner pushes the rhythm along, compliments the bass and harmony without overriding the general feel of the track.


Step 6. Go full cheese with your melodies

I’ve combined the talents of Titanium Piano, Chiptune MW and Gigawave to add trills, lead melody and synthetic texture to the topline here. Three different timbral bases and MIDI programming using velocity variation works really well here to add depth and movement to your melody – cheesy or not!
 

Now that you’ve learned to how to make Vaporwave with Layers Wave Edition, get Layers Wave Edition here and try it free for 30 days!

Tutorials

How to Use Delay in Reason 10

Posted April 17, 2018, 1:40 p.m.

Nothing adds space and depth to your recordings like delay and echo effects. Ever since musicians figured out how to bounce audio between reels of tape, delay has shaped the sound of modern music.

Reason 10 features powerful delay and echo processors, including The Echo, a feature-rich delay unit that combines elements from digital delays, analog delays, tape delays, glitch, and loop effects. In this article, you’ll learn how to use The Echo to dial in the perfect delay effects for your tracks.

Mini Tutorial: Reason The Echo

In this tutorial, you’ll discover how to use echo to spice-up synthesizer patches, add depth and character to vocals, and write spaced-out guitar lines in the style of U2 or Pink Floyd.

  • See how to use Triggered Mode to control exactly which moments get repeated.
  • Learn how to slice beats and phrases using a DJ-style crossfader with Roll Mode.
  • Add analog saturation with tape-limiting, overdrive, distortion, and tube warmth using the Color Section.
  • Emulate old-school tape delays like the Echoplex or the Space Echo using the Modulation Section.
  • Glitch drum loops, instruments, and even vocals for far-out effects.
     

Delay Ducking: Reason QuickTips

Delay can bring a lush sonic quality to vocals, but it can be difficult to balance wet and dry signals, which can lead to washed out tracks. Check out this quick tip tutorial to learn how to use The Echo’s ducking feature to ensure the perfect balance of delay on your vocal mixes.

Reason comes with several delay effects; from the bare-bones DDL-1 that does digital delay in its most basic form, via the RV7000 MkII Advanced Reverb that features some very lush echo programs to the multi-talented Echo that’s covered in the tutorial video above.

Now that you know how to use delay in Reason 10, it’s time to get creative! Start your free trial of Reason 10 today.

Tutorials

Beatmaking on the go with Reason and AKAI controllers

Posted April 16, 2018, 12:08 p.m.


 
Like many people, Justen Williams often finds himself making music on the go. And when he does, he wants to be just as creative and prolific as he is at home. To make that happen, Justen travels with AKAI portable controllers to help his fingers work as fast as his mind thinks in the rush of inspiration.
 
In this beat making walk-through, Justen shows us how and when he uses each of his controllers and offers a couple tips on making his small controllers work beyond their apparent size and range.

Reason Lite is available for free with the purchase of the following Akai hardware products:

• MPD218, MPD226, MPD232
• MPK225, MPK249, MPK261
• MPK mini mk2
• LPK25 Wireless, LPD8 Wireless
 
Current owners of these products can simply log in to their user account at http://www.akaipro.com to get their free Reason Lite license.

For more information on Reason:
http://www.propellerheads.se
 
For more information on AKAI controllers:
http://www.akaipro.com