How to Use Reverbs in Reason 10

Posted March 15, 2018, 9:09 a.m.

Creating a mix without reverb? That’s like baking a pizza without cheese, or eating a cupcake without frosting (maybe we’re hungry, but you get the point). Regardless of what style or genre of music you create, reverb is an essential tool in mixing. It brings a tangible sense of space and texture to your mixes, and even a small amount of verb can make a huge difference in the overall sound of your tracks.

Reason 10 is packed with powerful reverb processors that offer exceptional sonic flexibility and versatility. To help you get started, we’ve created a fast and easy-to-follow reverb tutorial that will teach you how to use reverbs in Reason—so you can dial in the perfect sound for your mixes.

RV7000 Advanced Reverb Tutorial

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use RV7000—Reason’s most advanced reverb processor, and the go-to tool for adding space to your tracks.

  • Explore a range of reverb sounds, including concert hall, retro spring reverb, or even a cramped closet
  • See how to set up an effects bus for reverb, and send channels to the effect directly from the mixer
  • Learn how to create a room reverb sound from scratch 

Getting Started with Convolution Reverb

Watch this video to learn how to use convolution reverb to add the sound of a real-world physical space to an instrument, and make it feel more live.

  • Explore patches and impulse responses included with the free RV7000 MKII Refill
  • Learn how to use impulse responses to shape the tonal characteristics of your reverb sounds
  • See how to record your own impulse responses and apply them to your tracks

Quick Tips for Using Gated Reverb

Check out this video for a series of quick tips on how to dial up gated reverb sounds on drums and other instruments.

  • See how to add synthetic, industrial, or retro (1980s) reverb to your snare or hand claps
  • Discover how to create different types of gated reverb sounds
  • Learn how to use different Gate parameters like Release, Hold, and Threshold

Now that you’ve learned all about reverb, it’s time to start making music and adding it to your tracks—start your free trial of Reason 10 today!



How to Chop Samples in Reason 10

Posted March 6, 2018, 12:20 p.m.

To sample or not to sample—that is the question. Actually no it’s not, of course you should sample anything and everything—and the more samples the merrier! In this article and accompanying video, we’ll show you how to sample in Reason 10.

But before we go any further, let’s take a quick stroll through the history books to see how sampling got started (yes, there was a time when sampling didn’t exist…shudder). So what is sampling?

Sampling first appeared in popular music in Jamaican dub music in the 1960s, when artists such as Lee “Scratch” Perry started using pre-recorded samples of reggae rhythms to produce new tracks. The technique quickly spread to psychedelic rock, jazz fusion, and minimalist music during the mid 1960s, and continued to gain traction in electronic and disco music production in the 1970s.

But sampling wasn’t considered a mainstream production technique until the mid 1980s, when DJs manipulated vinyl using two turntables and an audio mixer to create an entirely new genre of music that would dominate the world: hip hop.

With the global rise of hip hop and the release of dedicated digital samplers in the 1980s, sampling quickly found its way into every corner of the music world. And although music and audio technology have changed and evolved over the decades, sampling has remained an invaluable production tool for every conceivable genre—from indie rock to R&B.

Sampling in Reason is incredibly easy and intuitive, with a rich feature set that offers a range of sampling methods to fit any music creation workflow. In this video, hip hop producer, teacher, and sound designer MG The Future provides an in-depth sampling tutorial that will show you how to quickly create captivating arrangements using samples in Reason.

You’ll see how to use Kong’s Nurse REX Player, Slice Trigger Mode, Chunk Trigger Mode, and more to create deep and layered tracks with any sampled sound source (a must watch for J Dilla fans).

Watch the video now to learn how to chop samples in Reason 10!

Follow MG The Future on FacebookSoundCloud, YouTube and Instagram.

Start sampling today with a free trial of Reason 10!


Sparking New Ideas with Komplete Select & Reason

Posted Feb. 24, 2018, 1:03 p.m.

We rely on our favorite go-to instruments to capture new ideas as they're forming. We know those instruments well and they help us act quickly to grab that inspiration before it's gone. But what happens if we don't have any ideas cooking yet? Sometimes those favorites are so familiar that we fall into routines and habits that makes sparking new ideas harder for us. The solution is to try entirely new instruments and effects to see how getting out of our comfort zone can create a fresh approach to music making.

In this tutorial, Ryan does just that by building a new idea using instruments new to him. The quick inspiring workflow of Reason remains but the sounds and instruments are coming courtesy of Native Instrument's Komplete Select.

Start making your own musical ideas with Reason's free 30 day trial!


Making a Jazzy Boom Bap Beat in Reason 10

Posted Feb. 15, 2018, 10:44 a.m.

The world of hip-hop music production is full of genres and sub-genres, each with its own unique history and style. Take Boom Bap hip-hop for example. The central elements are a hard-hitting sampled kick drum (boom) and snare drum (bap), typically with the snare on two and four and the MC rapping on the beat.

Boom Bap developed out of the 1980s New York City breakbeat scene, and hit peak popularity in the 1990s, when artists like Wu-Tang Clan, Mobb Deep, Jay-Z, Nas and A Tribe Called Quest made Boom Bap one of the defining sounds of hip hop. Hip hop production has evolved a great deal since then, with the snare sound frequently replaced with a hand clap or other sample. Still, Boom Bap remains a popular, albeit retro technique that’s sometimes incorporated into other types of hip hop.

One such variation is Jazzy Hip Hop, which is related to the electronica subgenre Chill Hop. It features a mellow, jazzy groove made up of Boom Bap drums and short chordal samples taken from jazz records that typically provide much of the harmonic content.

Reason 10 provides the perfect toolset for creating Boom Bap and Jazzy Hip Hop beats, among many other styles. With myriad instruments and sample players, a massive effects collection, and powerful recording, editing and mixing features, all you need to add is your creativity.

In this video, producer, musician and educator Stefan Guy (stefanguyaudio.com) takes you step-by-step through the creation and production of a Boom Bap/Jazzy Hip Hop beat using Reason 10. He deploys Reason instruments such as Kong Drum Designer, NN-XT Advanced Sampler, and the brand-new Humana Vocal Ensemble—along with effects like Audiomatic Retro Transformer (which he uses for vinyl emulation)—showing you lots of cool production tricks along the way.

Follow Stefan Guy on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

Make a Boom Bap track yourself with a free trial of Reason 10!

Artist stories

Artist Feature: Weval

Posted Feb. 15, 2018, 10:24 a.m.

Harm Coolen and Merijn Scholte Albers are the brains and muscle of Weval. Together they dream up slow-burning, emotive and highly dynamic electronic music with a taste for danceable drama and epic melodies.

Debuting in 2013 with the „Half Age EP“, Weval have since released two more EPs and in 2016, their sonic expedition moved deeper into uncharted territory with the self-titled debut-full length „Weval“ - not a mere collection of interchangeable tracks, but an organically flowing record with emotional heft and a narrative thread.



We had the chance to speak with Harm and Merijn about how they are using Reason to produce their electronic landscapes.

When you load up a brand new Reason song, what’s the very first thing you do?
It depends on the mood we want to build, but mostly starting with chopping up a organic drumbeat.

What's your favorite thing in Reason?
Dr. Octo Rex - can't do anything without this tool.

Do you have any special Reason production trick that you always use?
When we discovered the tape distortion setting in Scream, in combination with reverb (especially if you put the reverb before the distortion) we were extremely happy. That's one of the first things we discovered, after that we felt a lot more confident about our sounds. We still use this technique.

The three most used devices in your Reason rack?
Dr. Octo Rex, Scream and Redrum.

What do you do when inspiration just isn't there? How do you tackle writer’s block?
There is no simple way to tackle a writers block. If it's really there for a long time, maybe then it's time to do something totally different outside of making music, which gives you some new input.

What's the best music making tip you ever got?
Never boost a digital equalizer, especially above 500 Hz. It can destroy a sound and make it sound harsh. If we want more presence we cut out the lows instead of boosting the highs.

What’s your all-time favorite album?
Haha, that's impossible to answer! Maybe it's the first Connan Mockasin album, or Radiohead's In Rainbows.

Follow Weval on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Soundcloud