How to Use Reverbs in Reason 10

Posted March 15, 2018, 9:09 a.m.

Creating a mix without reverb? That’s like baking a pizza without cheese, or eating a cupcake without frosting (maybe we’re hungry, but you get the point). Regardless of what style or genre of music you create, reverb is an essential tool in mixing. It brings a tangible sense of space and texture to your mixes, and even a small amount of verb can make a huge difference in the overall sound of your tracks.

Reason 10 is packed with powerful reverb processors that offer exceptional sonic flexibility and versatility. To help you get started, we’ve created a fast and easy-to-follow reverb tutorial that will teach you how to use reverbs in Reason—so you can dial in the perfect sound for your mixes.

RV7000 Advanced Reverb Tutorial

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use RV7000—Reason’s most advanced reverb processor, and the go-to tool for adding space to your tracks.

  • Explore a range of reverb sounds, including concert hall, retro spring reverb, or even a cramped closet
  • See how to set up an effects bus for reverb, and send channels to the effect directly from the mixer
  • Learn how to create a room reverb sound from scratch 

Getting Started with Convolution Reverb

Watch this video to learn how to use convolution reverb to add the sound of a real-world physical space to an instrument, and make it feel more live.

  • Explore patches and impulse responses included with the free RV7000 MKII Refill
  • Learn how to use impulse responses to shape the tonal characteristics of your reverb sounds
  • See how to record your own impulse responses and apply them to your tracks

Quick Tips for Using Gated Reverb

Check out this video for a series of quick tips on how to dial up gated reverb sounds on drums and other instruments.

  • See how to add synthetic, industrial, or retro (1980s) reverb to your snare or hand claps
  • Discover how to create different types of gated reverb sounds
  • Learn how to use different Gate parameters like Release, Hold, and Threshold

Now that you’ve learned all about reverb, it’s time to start making music and adding it to your tracks—start your free trial of Reason 10 today!



How to Chop Samples in Reason 10

Posted March 6, 2018, 12:20 p.m.

To sample or not to sample—that is the question. Actually no it’s not, of course you should sample anything and everything—and the more samples the merrier! In this article and accompanying video, we’ll show you how to sample in Reason 10.

But before we go any further, let’s take a quick stroll through the history books to see how sampling got started (yes, there was a time when sampling didn’t exist…shudder). So what is sampling?

Sampling first appeared in popular music in Jamaican dub music in the 1960s, when artists such as Lee “Scratch” Perry started using pre-recorded samples of reggae rhythms to produce new tracks. The technique quickly spread to psychedelic rock, jazz fusion, and minimalist music during the mid 1960s, and continued to gain traction in electronic and disco music production in the 1970s.

But sampling wasn’t considered a mainstream production technique until the mid 1980s, when DJs manipulated vinyl using two turntables and an audio mixer to create an entirely new genre of music that would dominate the world: hip hop.

With the global rise of hip hop and the release of dedicated digital samplers in the 1980s, sampling quickly found its way into every corner of the music world. And although music and audio technology have changed and evolved over the decades, sampling has remained an invaluable production tool for every conceivable genre—from indie rock to R&B.

Sampling in Reason is incredibly easy and intuitive, with a rich feature set that offers a range of sampling methods to fit any music creation workflow. In this video, hip hop producer, teacher, and sound designer MG The Future provides an in-depth sampling tutorial that will show you how to quickly create captivating arrangements using samples in Reason.

You’ll see how to use Kong’s Nurse REX Player, Slice Trigger Mode, Chunk Trigger Mode, and more to create deep and layered tracks with any sampled sound source (a must watch for J Dilla fans).

Watch the video now to learn how to chop samples in Reason 10!

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Start sampling today with a free trial of Reason 10!


Making a Jazzy Boom Bap Beat in Reason 10

Posted Feb. 15, 2018, 10:44 a.m.

The world of hip-hop music production is full of genres and sub-genres, each with its own unique history and style. Take Boom Bap hip-hop for example. The central elements are a hard-hitting sampled kick drum (boom) and snare drum (bap), typically with the snare on two and four and the MC rapping on the beat.

Boom Bap developed out of the 1980s New York City breakbeat scene, and hit peak popularity in the 1990s, when artists like Wu-Tang Clan, Mobb Deep, Jay-Z, Nas and A Tribe Called Quest made Boom Bap one of the defining sounds of hip hop. Hip hop production has evolved a great deal since then, with the snare sound frequently replaced with a hand clap or other sample. Still, Boom Bap remains a popular, albeit retro technique that’s sometimes incorporated into other types of hip hop.

One such variation is Jazzy Hip Hop, which is related to the electronica subgenre Chill Hop. It features a mellow, jazzy groove made up of Boom Bap drums and short chordal samples taken from jazz records that typically provide much of the harmonic content.

Reason 10 provides the perfect toolset for creating Boom Bap and Jazzy Hip Hop beats, among many other styles. With myriad instruments and sample players, a massive effects collection, and powerful recording, editing and mixing features, all you need to add is your creativity.

In this video, producer, musician and educator Stefan Guy (stefanguyaudio.com) takes you step-by-step through the creation and production of a Boom Bap/Jazzy Hip Hop beat using Reason 10. He deploys Reason instruments such as Kong Drum Designer, NN-XT Advanced Sampler, and the brand-new Humana Vocal Ensemble—along with effects like Audiomatic Retro Transformer (which he uses for vinyl emulation)—showing you lots of cool production tricks along the way.

Follow Stefan Guy on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

Make a Boom Bap track yourself with a free trial of Reason 10!


How to make a track with BIAS AMP 2 in Reason 10

Posted Feb. 14, 2018, 2:47 p.m.

Join Paul Ortiz a.k.a. Chimp Spanner as he shows you how to get started making a track using the brand new BIAS AMP 2 virtual amp designer VST plugin by Positive Grid in Reason 10. Making use of the modular approach in the Reason rack, Paul utilizes both well-known Reason devices such as the Scream 4 Distortion unit as well as POD VST plugins by Line6 along with BIAS AMP 2.

BIAS AMP 2 by Positive Grid is the ultimate virtual amp designer, authentically recreating the tone and feel of real tube amplifiers, while allowing you to mix and match components to create your ideal amp. You can use Amp Match to clone the tone of real hardware or a guitar track, or connect to the ToneCloud® to gain access to thousands of custom amps from artists and recording studios, or upload your own custom tones to the cloud.

Want to win Reason 10 and BIAS AMP 2?
Click here to enter a giveaway for a chance to win Reason 10 and BIAS AMP 2!

Reason is the music-making software with everything you need to start making music.
Get the free trial of Reason and start making your own tracks!

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Artist stories

Music Talk: Kato on the track - The Making of Get It N Go in Reason

Posted Jan. 26, 2018, 10:08 a.m.

One Week Notice is the title of a 1-week collaborative concept album featuring 9 Hip-Hop Artists and Producers - Dizzy Wright, Jarren Benton, Demrick, Audio Push, Emilio Rojas, Reezy, Kato and DJ Hoppa. It was recorded fully in Austin, TX at the BeatStars studio and over 20 songs were created during the 7-day process, with 13 making it onto the album.

Kato On The Track is a Music Producer/Entrepreneur out of Atlanta, GA., best known for his production with Artists like: B.o.B, Hopsin, Jarren Benton, Dizzy Wright, Wu-Tang, Joyner Lucas, Token, Tory Lanez, K Camp, Futuristic, Sy Ari and more. Kato is also the founder of a Producer mentorship program, Beat Club, which educates and provides resources and networking to aspiring music Producers around the world.

We caught Kato to have a talk about the One Week Notice project and his workflow in Reason.

Tell us how the One Week Notice came about. Whose idea was it to complete an album in one week? 
One Week Notice was the brain child of Dame Ritter, former CEO of Funk Volume, whom I was signed to up until 2016. We've been friends since, and he basically just called me one day and asked if I'd be interested in flying to Austin for a week, staying in a house full of rappers, and making music all day. What could be better?
Could you share some insights on how to collaborate successfully with so many people involved and with that kind of tight deadline? 
The key to collaborating with that many people is just to leave any ego at the door and be open to working with other creatives. After that, the rest is easy.
When you load up a brand new Reason song, what’s the very first thing you do?
The first thing I do when I open Reason is load a template. I have different templates for working with vocals, starting a beat, etc. After I load my template, then I'll start searching for the perfect sound to start my melody, or sometimes I'll start with drums first. I usually have an idea going into the project of what I want to make, it's just a matter of finding the right sounds.
What drives you musically? Why do you make music?
My motivation for making music is the same as it was on Day 1. It's the only thing that allows me to create something from nothing without any rules or boundaries - what else allows you to do that?? It's absolute 100% freedom to do whatever you want and that idea to me is so amazing in a world full of rules. 

What do you do when inspiration just isn't there? Any tips on tackling writer’s block? 
I hate forcing creativity. When I don't feel inspired by what I'm doing, it takes the fun out of it and doing what you love should always be fun. Most of the time when I lack inspiration, I either step away from the music altogether and do something entirely different, or I'll find inspiration in collaborating with others. I've also been using Splice a lot.

Do you have any special Reason production trick that you always use?
I've been using the Decimort 2 a LOT recently. It adds so much cool texture whenever I need that extra unique quality. I like anything that takes something clean and makes it dirty.
The three most used devices in your Reason rack?
Kong Drum Designer, NN-XT and the McDSP C670 Compressor are CRUCIAL to me in every session I start. I can probably make an amazing beat using only those 3 devices and nothing else!
Watch how Kato made "Get It N Go" in Reason:
Check out the official video for "Get It N Go" off the One Week Notice album: