Making a Jazzy Boom Bap Beat in Reason 10

Posted Feb. 15, 2018, 10:44 a.m.

The world of hip-hop music production is full of genres and sub-genres, each with its own unique history and style. Take Boom Bap hip-hop for example. The central elements are a hard-hitting sampled kick drum (boom) and snare drum (bap), typically with the snare on two and four and the MC rapping on the beat.

Boom Bap developed out of the 1980s New York City breakbeat scene, and hit peak popularity in the 1990s, when artists like Wu-Tang Clan, Mobb Deep, Jay-Z, Nas and A Tribe Called Quest made Boom Bap one of the defining sounds of hip hop. Hip hop production has evolved a great deal since then, with the snare sound frequently replaced with a hand clap or other sample. Still, Boom Bap remains a popular, albeit retro technique that’s sometimes incorporated into other types of hip hop.

One such variation is Jazzy Hip Hop, which is related to the electronica subgenre Chill Hop. It features a mellow, jazzy groove made up of Boom Bap drums and short chordal samples taken from jazz records that typically provide much of the harmonic content.

Reason 10 provides the perfect toolset for creating Boom Bap and Jazzy Hip Hop beats, among many other styles. With myriad instruments and sample players, a massive effects collection, and powerful recording, editing and mixing features, all you need to add is your creativity.

In this video, producer, musician and educator Stefan Guy (stefanguyaudio.com) takes you step-by-step through the creation and production of a Boom Bap/Jazzy Hip Hop beat using Reason 10. He deploys Reason instruments such as Kong Drum Designer, NN-XT Advanced Sampler, and the brand-new Humana Vocal Ensemble—along with effects like Audiomatic Retro Transformer (which he uses for vinyl emulation)—showing you lots of cool production tricks along the way.

Follow Stefan Guy on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

Make a Boom Bap track yourself with a free trial of Reason 10!



Posted Nov. 11, 2015, 1:57 p.m.


I own LOTS of hardware. I like hardware. But when you're programming patterns and loops in hardware, you generally find you're looking at a XOXOX style row of 16 triggers. If you stick to laying out triggers in groups of 16, it's fairly easy for things to get pretty stale and repetitive. I use a number of tricks to try and avoid this, and I wanted to see if they could be replicated in Reason. The first of these is using repeated patterns of differing lengths to create polyrhythms.

Let's start with a fairly simple pattern using the kick, clap and hihat:

The kick and clap here are playing a pattern that repeats itself every bar -  that is every 16 steps (where a step is a 16th note).

Let's add another voice to the pattern, but instead of a pattern that repeats every 16 steps, lets add a shorter pattern that begins again after only 6 steps. We can create a clip on the sequencer track that's just 6 steps (six 16th notes) long.

Hear how - even though it's at the same tempo - it slides out of sync with the original kick and clap pattern?

So now we have two patterns running alongside each other; one that's a bar long and one that's just a little under half a bar. It'll be three bars before these two patterns catch up with each other and start in sync again.

Now let's add another voice. This time I'm using a pattern that's 15 steps long.

Now my pattern won't start to repeat itself until after an entire 15 bars.

Let's add a last voice, this time using a pattern that repeats itself every eighteen steps.

Lay this on top of the original pattern, and now we have a lilting, rolling pattern that, while still being perfectly in time, is varied in such a way that it will only repeat itself after 45 bars!

Try creating polyrhythms yourself by building patterns for Kong or the ReDrum using clips that don't all start and end in the same place. Experiment with different lengths, and then go back and edit the parts if you want - perhaps you want to delete two voices that are triggered at the same time, for example.

And by all means, take the piece I've been using for an example here and add your ideas in Reason or Take. Here it is in its entirety - all 45 bars of it!


djanDownload a picture of the grid

By request, here's a picture of the grid for this pattern - I've coloured the different voices in using their clip colours, and added boxes at the beginning of the pattern to show where each clip starts and ends.

- craig

Posted Nov. 11, 2015, 1:57 p.m.


Electro Pop Drums: Super Neat Beat Cheat Sheet

Posted Oct. 20, 2015, 3:02 p.m.

If you're cray cray for #TayTay or gaga for... well... Gaga, then this tutorial is for you. Electro Pop drums are all about hard hitting, crisp, beats that support the song and give you just enough to clap along with.

In this episode of the Super Neat Beat Cheat Sheet series, Ryan walks you through the creation of pop drums but also shows you his favorite Drum Machine in Reason and it's one you might not even know exists.


Discovering Reason

Posted Jan. 28, 2015, 10:21 a.m.

Discovering Reason is a series of articles created especially for people who have been using Reason for some time, yet can't help but feel they've only scratched the surface. While many of them were written for much older Reason versions, they're more retro or classic than out of date.

Reason's endless possibilities are not always obvious and there's a myriad of nifty tricks hidden in this open-ended production environment. We are creatures of habit, and it's easy to become lazy and get stuck in routines - routines which are often a heritage from other production environments that emphasise on quantity and diversity rather than flexibility and experimentalism.

The articles will assume that you have a fair amount of experience with Reason, and will not cover all the details of certain basic operations. Consult the Reason Operation Manual if you stumble upon something unfamiliar.

Part 40: Control Voltages and Gates by Gordon Reid
Part 39: Creative Sampling Tricks by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 38: Thor demystified 17: Formant Filters by Gordon Reid
Part 37: Thor demystified 16: Comb Filters by Gordon Reid
Part 36: Thor demystified 15: Resonance by Gordon Reid
Part 35: Thor demystified 14: High pass filters by Gordon Reid
Part 34: Thor demystified 13: Intro to filters by Gordon Reid
Part 33: Control Remote by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 32: Thor demystified 12: The Wavetable oscillator pt 2 by Gordon Reid
Part 31: Thor demystified 11: The Wavetable oscillator pt 1 by Gordon Reid
Part 30: Thor demystified 10: An introduction to FM Synthesis pt 2 by Gordon Reid
Part 29: Thor demystified 9: An introduction to FM Synthesis pt 1 by Gordon Reid
Part 28: Lost & found: Hidden gems in Reason 4 by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 27: Thor demystified 8: More on Phase Modulation by Gordon Reid
Part 26: Getting down & dirty with delay by Fredrik Hägglund and James Bernard
Part 25: Thor demystified 7: The Phase Modulation Oscillator by Gordon Reid
Part 24: Thor demystified 6: Standing on Alien Shorelines by Gordon Reid
Part 23: Thor demystified 5: The Noise Oscillator by Gordon Reid
Part 22: Thor demystified 4: The Multi Oscillator by Gordon Reid
Part 21: Thor demystified 3: Pulse Width Modulation by Gordon Reid
Part 20: Thor demystified 2: Analog AM & Sync by Gordon Reid
Part 19: Thor demystified 1: The Analogue Oscillator by Gordon Reid
Part 18: Making friends with clips by Fredrik Hylvander
Part 17: Let's RPG-8! by Fredrik Hylvander
Part 16: One Hand in the Mix - Combinator Crossfaders by Kurt "Peff" Kurasaki
Part 15: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Combinator - part II by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 14: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Combinator - part I by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 13: Go With the Workflow by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 12: Filter Up by Kurt "Peff" Kurasaki
Part 11: Itsy Bitsy Spiders - part II by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 10: Itsy Bitsy Spiders - part I by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 9: Take it to the NN-XT level by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 8: Six strings attached by Jerry McPherson
Part 7: Space Madness! by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 6: Scream and Scream Again by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 5: Reason Vocoding 101 by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 4: What is the Matrix? by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 3: Mastering Mastering by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 2: Dial R for ReDrum by Fredrik Hägglund
Part 1: Ask Dr. REX! by Fredrik Hägglund

Posted Jan. 28, 2015, 10:21 a.m.


How to add groove with ReGroove

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 11:35 a.m.

Want your tracks to really groove? Tired of using the same shuffle setting for everything? ReGroove is there for you and product specialist Mattias will help you understand how to do it! Learn how to change the global shuffle, assign a groove to a track, create your own groove templates and some other tips and tricks in this Reason Tips video.

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 11:35 a.m.