Free reverb resources - where to find impulse responses

Posted July 22, 2015, 12:37 p.m.

Hi there, Stefan here. I just wanted to go through a few resources of where to find new impulse responses to use with the new convolution mode in the updated RV7000 MkII–when you're finished going through the massive RV7000 MkII ReFill, that is.

There is a plethora of free impulse responses (IR files) out there on the web which are free to acquire and free to use. This is only a list of a few of them, so if you're feeling bold, just do a google search for "free impulse responses" and I'm sure you'll find even more.

Another cool trick is if you use Logic Pro, you can simply rename the .sdir files used in Space Designer to .aiff or .wav and they can be used in the RV7000 MkII!  You can find the .sdir files in the following directory: ~/Library/Application Support/Logic/Impulse Responses.

Starting with the most important ones, well, since I'm a guitar player.

Guitar cabs

RedWirez
Marshall 1960A cabinet.
http://www.redwirez.com/free1960g12m25s.jsp

GuitarAmpModeling.com
Huge amounts of guitar cabs, and general talk about IR use.
http://guitarampmodeling.com/viewforum.php?f=32

Kalthallen Cabs Free
Guitar cabinets.
http://cabs.kalthallen.de/kalthallen_free.html

Signalaudio's God Cab 1.4
Mesa guitar cabinet.
http://signalsaudio.com/product/gods-cab-1-4/

Spaces

AirWindows
Huge spaces sampled here.
http://www.airwindows.com/airwindows-impulses/

EchoThief
Lots of unique spaces.
http://www.echothief.com/

Intelligent Machinery Productions
Experimental and artifical and unnatural spaces.
http://www.intelligentmachinery.net/?page_id=764
http://www.intelligentmachinery.net/?page_id=114

OpenAIR
Real acoustic spaces, interesting buildings and other sources.
http://www.openairlib.net/

Balance Mastering
Try your mix through the Funktion One sound system at The Hive Project night club.
http://www.balancemastering.com/blog/free-funktion-one-impulse-responses-ir-irs-convolution/
A very cool and unique space here, how about an old German NSA listening tower?
http://www.balancemastering.com/blog/free-teufelsberg-nsa-listening-tower-impulse-responses-ir-irs-convolution/

Voxengo
Various spaces.
http://www.voxengo.com/impulses/

Diego Stocco
Free/donation for this bonus pack, good for rhythmical material.
https://gumroad.com/l/FFSCA

Samplicity
Two free halls.
http://www.samplicity.com/download/

Reverbs

Lexicon 480L
Classic reverb.
http://www.housecallfm.com/download-gns-personal-lexicon-480l

Fokke van Saane's Impulse Responses
Lots of classic reverbs, springs and speakers, and also: his own mouth (!).
http://fokkie.home.xs4all.nl/IR.htm

Pipelineaudio
Eventide DSP4000 and TC Electronics M5000.
http://pipelineaudio.net/downloads/convolution-and-impulses/

zidee
Lexicon PCM90.
http://homepage.hispeed.ch/zidee/

Samplicity
Bricasti M7, classic reverb unit.
http://www.samplicity.com/bricasti-m7-impulse-responses/

Signal To Noise
Lots of classic reverb units
http://signaltonoize.com/?page_id=4188

Posted July 22, 2015, 12:37 p.m.

Elite Session with Lucky Date

Posted July 20, 2015, 2:15 p.m.

 

House producer and long time Reason user Lucky Date recently joined up with Pyramind and held a two hour Elite Session which is now available online over at their website. Among LOTS of other things, Lucky Date talks about his production process and workflow in Reason and also how he came to the name "Lucky Date". We get an in-depth exploration of his own tracks and how they came about, as well as a discussion about collaboration techniques when working with other producers and musicians.

Check out the video teaser below and then head over to Pyramind's website for the full two hour Elite Session.

 


Click here to watch the full two hour Elite Session with Lucky Date!

 

Pyramind Training, the San Francisco music production school, operates side by side with Pyramind Studios. Pyramind offers a wide range of programs; Music for Picture and Games, Electronic Music Production and Rock & Acoustic recording as well as four online programs centered around specific DAWs.

Click here to learn more about the courses at Pyramind Training!

 

 

Posted July 20, 2015, 2:15 p.m.

Hot Sugar on Sampling the World

Posted Nov. 18, 2013, 3:49 p.m.

Hot Sugar Cropped

When you come across a video where someone samples percussion and snoring (!) together with an older gentleman covered in tattoos, it's hard not to be curious. Therefore we had a quick chat with New York-based mad audio experimentalist Hot Sugar to find out more about his approach to music production.

Your music is full of  unique sounds, could you tell us a bit about how you create them?
I record a lot of sounds on portable recorders then import them to the NN-XT to make patches. I make everything from basses to keys or sustained organ type patches. I'll compose a melody and add instrumentation surrounding it. After that I import drum samples i've recorded into Redrum or Kong and make a beat to accompany the riffs I created. Between the drum machines and the samplers you can make a whole song.

My favorite patches are the ones I've made using recordings I couldn't hear at the time (usually because they were too quiet or even silent). Just because we don't hear something doesn't mean there isn't a sound, tone or texture to present. I love recording "silence" and cranking up the volume afterwards to hear the intricacies our ears cant. I've made number of patches from roomtones that at first seemed silent but once distorted and compressed sounded like eerie whistles or even basses. I usually throw them into the NN-XT too.

When I travel to a place I haven't been to before I turn on my recorder and capture it (whether a new place a couple blocks from my apartment or another country entirely). Sometimes I like to scroll through my folders of recordings and press play without reading the filename. Some are recognizable but most are confusing and disorienting. I try to picture the spot and by then my imagination gets the best of me. Once I'm lost in that world I can hear other melodies and things going on so the songs start writing themselves.

Any Words of Wisdom for aspiring producers and musicians?
There are plenty of stock sounds offered by a program like Reason but there are an infinite number of other ones outside that are just waiting to be recorded and brought back to your computer. The sounds that come with the program are incredibly impressive but the real gift Reason offers is the ability to transform whatever you want on your own.

Posted Nov. 18, 2013, 3:49 p.m.

KOAN Sound on Sound Design

Posted Nov. 4, 2013, 2:20 p.m.

koan555

We caught up with music production duo KOAN Sound to learn a bit more about how they use Reason in their music. Little that we know that they'd reveal some truly amazing tips for designing synths and bass lines. Read on to find out how they create those gut-wrenching bass sounds and mind-bending effects!

Could you tell us a little bit about how you guys approach sound design in Reason?
We use Reason mainly for creating synths and basslines. The Malström synth is used for pretty much every bass sound, and we normally use the different saw and square wave variations. By themselves they're very chunky waveforms so they provide a great basis for an endless number of sounds. Most of our bass sounds are made by first making a long bass note and giving it some movement so we can later resample it in interesting ways. To get the movement we tend to go crazy with automation and effects until we get a dynamic but clean sound. For example we'll add an EQ before a Scream 4 in the chain of effects because when you automate the EQ frequency and gain, it combines with the distortion to create really cool movement. Then we'll usually export and resample the sound.

We resample a lot in Reason with the NN-19. It's an easy way to get a bass sounding really techy. For example when we have a sound we like in the NN-19, we'll duplicate it then apply different effects to each one, dedicating one to the low end and the other for highs and mids. For example we might add a bandpass filter to one of them and slightly detune it in the sampler so when the bandpass is automated it sweeps through the frequencies and phases them which sounds pretty nice. We could then export this again and repeat if needs be. Also, the notch filter on the NN-19 is awesome and we use it often to give bass more movement.

The Scream 4 distortion is probably our favourite thing about Reason. It's such a versatile tool and can completely mangle sounds whilst keeping them relatively clean. We've used it to process snares too. The loud, metallic snares in 'Meanwhile, In The Future' were made by putting live snare samples through the Scream 4. It created these huge exaggerated tails which didn't sound overly distorted.

Any specific sound design tips you got that really helped you out?
Best thing we learnt was to think about sounds in three parts: lows, middles and highs. This helps with the overall mix of the track because you can then add and remove frequencies so it comes together like a jigsaw. But it's also incredibly helpful when thinking about bass sounds. Splitting bass into multiple parts and treating each part differently with filters and effects can create very sonically pleasing sounds.

Do you have any favorite sound or patch or do you create everything from scratch?
For our more melodic tracks we often use the Hall Strings from the NN-XT. When low pass filtered and with some reverb they can provide a very deep and warm layer to the track. Even when we've used live recordings of violins, like in our Sanctuary EP, we layered them with these Reason strings to thicken out the mix.

Posted Nov. 4, 2013, 2:20 p.m.

How to Make an Aggressive Dubstep Bass

Posted Sept. 7, 2013, 12:16 p.m.

Max Rehbein (aka Dorincourt) joins us for a guest video, showing you how to create an aggressive, hard hitting dubstep bass. Using the standard Reason devices, learn how to really get your sound to roar by using effects and how to make it sit well in the mix.

After this, you'll be able to make that love-it-or-hate-it dirty wobble bass we all know!

Posted Sept. 7, 2013, 12:16 p.m.