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-   -   Does clipping matter in the mastering process? (https://www.propellerheads.se/forum/showthread.php?t=172081)

parachutes 2012-12-02 21:24

Does clipping matter in the mastering process?
 
I have a lot of clips in reason in my mixes. im still new to the whole mixing process, so im figuring it out. my question is that when i send my mixes to get mastered, do the clips create a problem? would the engineers send them back and be like 'we cant master with clips'?

esperdiv 2012-12-02 21:36

Think of digital sound as a room with a ceiling.
Think of yourself as bouncing around that room on a pogo stick. That's the music.
Think of the audio file you are sending the mastering engineer as a videotape of your pogo stick performance in the room.

As you increase the volume of the music, you make the spring stiffer on the pogo stick, so that you go higher.

At one point, your head hits the ceiling. Ouch. That's clipping.

If the ceiling weren't there, you could have gone higher, but you are limited by the ceiling so you bang it up there.

Imagine now, that the role of the mastering engineer, is to make the videotape of your pogo stick performance look good. He wants to zoom in on the good moments and give wide panning shots of your pogo stick wizardry.

If you are doing a performance for a godawful stupid reality show, go ahead - trash the roof.
If your performance is destined for Cirque du Soleil, however, I'd advise practicing the pogo stick a little more.


Come to think of it, that did not make any sense.

JensenTNI 2012-12-02 21:58

Clipping is an issue, its basically distortion but the baddest kind of distortion, because it cuts of the peaks of your sound. Meaning, everything above the clipping level or the "ceiling" as was described before gets chopped of. The mastering engineer cannot restore this missing sound. Try to place a limiter or master compressor onto your master channel, so that the peaks are not chopped off but rather smoothened out.
On a side note, I'm not sure if it is a good idea to get your tune so loud that it clips if you want to give it to a mastering engineer in the first place. He will make the tune as loud as it can be anyway but without the loss of sound information. I would recommend to leave about -4 to -6 db of headroom, so there will be plenty of dynamic to work with when mastering.

moneykube 2012-12-02 22:01

clipping is no good for mastering.... it is hard or at least next to impossible to fix it... there are ways to lessen it's awful effect but, if possible reduce the volume of the tracks.... better for everyone involved , including the cash u pay will be less.

Lunesis 2012-12-02 22:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by parachutes (Post 1190442)
I have a lot of clips in reason in my mixes. im still new to the whole mixing process, so im figuring it out. my question is that when i send my mixes to get mastered, do the clips create a problem? would the engineers send them back and be like 'we cant master with clips'?

If you are clipping the engineer will have no room to do anything. Most of the time clipping will be caused by bass or bass drum, so make sure to keep those in check. Also check your individual levels, you want everything to be around -10 db, maybe a bit under. If you can't hear your bass try adding a pulveriser to give it some high frequencies, since high freqs are more audible and take up less headroom.

EricBom 2012-12-03 08:06

Clipping is not an issue if you want to sound like Prodigy......

devilfish 2012-12-03 10:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by ericbom (Post 1190633)
clipping is not an issue if you want to sound like prodigy......

quote !!! :d



...........................

koma7 2012-12-03 13:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by esperdiv (Post 1190448)
Think of digital sound as a room with a ceiling.
Think of yourself as bouncing around that room on a pogo stick. That's the music.
Think of the audio file you are sending the mastering engineer as a videotape of your pogo stick performance in the room.

As you increase the volume of the music, you make the spring stiffer on the pogo stick, so that you go higher.

At one point, your head hits the ceiling. Ouch. That's clipping.

If the ceiling weren't there, you could have gone higher, but you are limited by the ceiling so you bang it up there.

Imagine now, that the role of the mastering engineer, is to make the videotape of your pogo stick performance look good. He wants to zoom in on the good moments and give wide panning shots of your pogo stick wizardry.

If you are doing a performance for a godawful stupid reality show, go ahead - trash the roof.
If your performance is destined for Cirque du Soleil, however, I'd advise practicing the pogo stick a little more.


Come to think of it, that did not make any sense.

+10

Just about the most creative, amusing and yet still somehow helpful explanation of clipping, hah.

normen 2012-12-03 13:46

Just pull down the master fader until you have no clips in the master anymore. Any clipping in the signal path should not matter too much as reason internally uses at least 32bits (in REs) or 64bit (in its native signal flow) and has enough headroom. Some plugins might not react too nicely towards too high levels though, but I didn't experience any serious issues in this regard (as opposed to Logic for example).

devilfish 2012-12-03 14:30

i had NEVER touched the masterfader.. For 12 months, not
I do something wrong???

if there is a need to pull them down.. i think there is something wrong in the mix :D


if you have an Analogue Mixer.. and push 12-16 channels in.. with max. Gain..
you have distortion in the master buss..
even if you pull the fader down ,...

i dont know.. but i think it is not good to do it this way,.. with the master fader pull down!


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