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Old 2012-12-12, 17:15
youngwest's Avatar
youngwest youngwest is offline
 
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Vocal Treatment

I need some help on making my vocals fatter any advice?
  #2  
Old 2012-12-12, 19:22
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rVOLT rVOLT is offline
 
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Before all else, you need a decent mic and you need to be recording as loud as possible without distortion or you'll be enhancing all the line garbage too.


Also, it helps to have a vocal presence to begin with. If your voice is nerdy, airy, or just lacking depth, its never a good start...

Use compression, use stereo imager, and EQ it up
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Last edited by rVOLT; 2012-12-12 at 19:26.
  #3  
Old 2012-12-12, 23:40
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carlgrace carlgrace is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by youngwest View Post
I need some help on making my vocals fatter any advice?
The biggest thing you can do to make your vocals fatter is to multitrack them. Record three versions of your singing a verse, for example. Pan one in the middle, one maybe 30% left and one 30% right. Make the ones on the left and right a little quieter and use a bit more reverb on them (be sure to use a send for the reverb so the tracks sound similar). Adjust to taste and you'll be in Fat City.

PS It sounds WAY better if you sing multiple tracks. Using one track and delaying them always sounded thin to me. If you want a example of how vocals sound that way check out this track. I multitrack three vocal tracks in the verse:

Loading SoundCloud…


Good luck! Practice makes perfect.
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Last edited by carlgrace; 2012-12-12 at 23:42.
  #4  
Old 2012-12-13, 21:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlgrace View Post
The biggest thing you can do to make your vocals fatter is to multitrack them. Record three versions of your singing a verse, for example. Pan one in the middle, one maybe 30% left and one 30% right. Make the ones on the left and right a little quieter and use a bit more reverb on them (be sure to use a send for the reverb so the tracks sound similar). Adjust to taste and you'll be in Fat City.

PS It sounds WAY better if you sing multiple tracks. Using one track and delaying them always sounded thin to me. If you want a example of how vocals sound that way check out this track. I multitrack three vocal tracks in the verse:

Loading SoundCloud…


Good luck! Practice makes perfect.
+1 for this. I do it do in the chorus (and a little on the verses too. I brought the volume of the double tracked vocals during verses down tho.)
Doing this really makes them fatter and more wide.

Loading SoundCloud…


Here's another trick I do:
(It's done in Pro Tools, but it can be done in Reason.)



If the video doesn't work, here's the youtube link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1eA6X7Nz0Y
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  #5  
Old 2012-12-13, 21:41
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I've been searching for a bigger sounding vocal for a long time. Doubling is effective, but it's not always the effect I want. What about the verses that I don't want chorused sounding?

Personally I've found that pushing the compressor a little harder makes the vocal more up front and in your face. You can even lean toward limiting (high ratio). I remember hearing a friend's vocal recordings and asking him how he got such a great sounding vocal - he said he always puts a limiter on it. That can be a bit extreme, and you certainly kill your dynamic range, but when I tried it, it gave me more of the present, in your face, dramatic vocal than the $1,000 mic I bought last year.
  #6  
Old 2012-12-15, 06:25
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You gotta take in account the room's acoustics whenever your recording vocals. Find a good room (acousticaly treated would be best) and stear clear of recording vocals in any really small room (or closet). It's even hard to acousticall treat a small room like a closet so your better off recording never recording inside of a closet.
Serial compression is one of the best things you can do to get that in your face vocal. One of the best serial compression combinations is using a FET compressor with a fast attack/release (I usually set mine to the fastest attack and release settings) setting followed by a LA-2A (or the RE RA-2A by cakewalk while using Reason 6.5). The first compressor is used to catch the intial peaks and the second to iron things out even more.
Using a HPF (high pass filter) is another great way to get rid of any low end that isn't needed on the vocals. I usually start with the HPF at around 100Hz and move it up higher until I like it. I also like to HPF any add libs alot higher than the main vocal.
Ducking (side chain compression) any reverb (with the vocal ducking it) that's going to be on the vocal sounds great IMO. That way you only the vocal tails will have any reverb on it. Before I started using this technique the reverb I added on vocals either had too much (drowned it out or sounded to washed in reverb) or it didn't sound like it had enough reverb on it.
Doubling vocal takes are another thing you can do to fatten vocals up. When I double a main verse I focus on getting the first vocal stack how I like it (compression, ect...) and then raise the vocal stack up from no sound until I like how it sits together. As for the chorus I've done up to 6 vocal stacks and have each panned out differently but balanced for each side (L and R).
You could also do some parallel compression to the vocal stack. Have a copy of the vocal track and just smash it with compression and raise the volume till it sits well. I don't really do this to vocals that much any more though as I find serial compression works to my liking.
These are just a few things I could think of not taking into account a good quality mic, good quality mic pre amps or A/D converters. I figured these things were known by everyone so I left that out. I hope this can help you get a good sound from your vocal recordings. Good luck!
  #7  
Old 2012-12-15, 07:05
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This is my typical setup for vocals... I don't always add the flanger/ but this setup sure sounded beefy. I like the "Vocal Booth" reverb too - it's nice and fat.

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  #8  
Old 2012-12-16, 22:22
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Thanks for these great tips, guys!
 

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